Question 1

What has changed since 2009 in your relationships with your community, funders, other non-profits, and government (at all levels)?


Volunteer Campbell River
Community:

Being better known in community. Able to offer more training through partner organizations.  Able to provide more information to the whole community – press releases, social media (facebook event page, previously twitter and wordpress)

Funders:

Previously received funding through Bingo every 3 years, now its yearly through the BC Community Gaming Grant. Have to reapply for funding every year, makes it harder to plan ahead. Would be a huge concern if this funding stopped.

Non-Profits:

Continuing good relationships with other non-profits. Online community hub is great and makes a difference in recruiting/refering and streamlining volunteers to other orgs (since June 2012.) Do surveys and events with other groups & a successful  volunteer fair for the past 3 years. Member orgs going from 97 to 101 recently.

Government:

BC funding has changed (gaming grant), receive municiple in-kind space. More municipal  visits in past years.


Volunteer Kootenays
Community:

 With community, we have a strong sense of community support. We’re part of safe community in Cranbrook. We aim to make sure that we don’t duplicate services and work together as much as possible.  I think our relationship with the community has grown stronger especially over the last year.  Our volunteer numbers have actually doubled over the last year. Cranbrook has smaller towns around it (2 or 3 hour drive). Agencies have approached us to become part of Volunteer Kootenays. For example, we’re working with both Fernie and Golden. New Program: Seniors check in system. Some seniors find it stressful to have a visitor come to their house. Volunteers phone individuals for about 10 minutes to check in and see how the day is going. It’s a supplement to Volunteer Visitor Program.  If we need to have a senior wait for a Seniors Friendly Visitor we can have them used the check in program.

Funders:

Core funding hasn’t changed. There is more strain on need for volunteers (predominantly seniors). There is more relying on fundraising and grants.  We are mainly funded through Gaming Grants and a small amount from Interior health. Most of our money comes from local fundraising. We do a Volunteer Gala every year as a fundraiser as well as a community Christmas dinner. Any extra money goes back to volunteer Kootenays to continue our programming.

Non-Profits:

We’re always figuring out how to work with non-profits. We’re on 2-3 committees to make sure we know what everyone is doing and we have a strong communication with each other. We place volunteers with agencies outside the CMHA to match interests and to support one-time events.

Government:

Not really. Core funding is from community gaming grants and some from interior health. This has not changed over the past 5 years.


VPG Small

Community:

I don’t [think] that we’ve had too much in the way of changes. We are working on developing our profile. Doing some rebranding. Broadening our awareness in the community. We had a marketing company develop a new logo which was launched during National Volunteer Week. We’ve done some promotional signs… Yellowhead Bridge and Signs puts out a sign on the highway for us on a regular basis. Working on re-branding and advertising on Facebook.

City of Prince George is the host for the 2015 Canada Winter Games. We’ve been working in support of that event. 4,500 volunteers needed. So far about 3,500 recruited. We’ve been soliciting “Why I volunteer” stories and have gathered 12 stories for paper, online, etc.

City of Prince George has passed a motion in principle to re-brand the Prince George as the City of Volunteers. Still gathering feedback and will be finalizing in time to be unveiled in conjunction with 2015 100th anniversary of the city.

Funders:

Basically, it’s very similar to what we’ve done in the past. We have gaming support. We get support from the city of Prince George. Apply for grants for activities such as volunteer week, volunteer managers appreciation day, etc.

Non-Profits:

We have 130 member organizations (usually at between 125 and 130) … that relationship continues. We partner with university and college to take part in job fairs, wellness days, etc.

Government:

City has approved re-branding of Prince George based around “City of Volunteers”. No changes with senior governments. Had a situation with gaming last year. Regulations changed so that balance sheet should not show that surplus is more the 50% of revenues. Does not take into account project funds that may have been awarded, but not yet spent. We had to write a letter explaining why we had more money than usual at the end of March and it all worked out fine.


VRIS Small-1

Community:

Not much has changed since 2008 in terms of the clients. We continue to work in close partnership with agencies/government.

Funders:

We are constantly aware of funding. Key funders grow and change in which areas they support. Major funders  have undergone mandate changes and this has impacted how we apply for funds: e.g. Coast capital only funds youth related programs now, so only can get funding for youth programming not other types. Funders looking for short term (start up) programs. Have to re-evaluate how to tell our story differently to engage new funders.

Non-Profits:

Not much change. We work closely with other non-profits, have stable relationships.

Government:

Stable relationship. Recieve provincial government funding & federal (New horizons -seniors) Better at home provincial health makes contacts with local agencies, now this is managed by UW & groups have to apply to be a lead agency. harder to get sustaining funding.


VP Small

Funders:

One of the most promising developments is a relationship we have created with municipal government where they have deliberately invested in creating a pool of money for their funded organizations to access to support learning and development opportunities. Apart from grants, they can go to governance trainings, send E.D.to build leaderships skills, etc. We did independent evaluation – surprising results in terms of the high level of impact. That was a very successful partnership and a promising model for other funders to think about. If we are investing can we also support learning and capacity to use funds more effectively. Through City of Vancouver.

Non-Profits:

The shift in volunteer pool and motivation hasn’t correlated to the practices of organizations that are crafting volunteer positions and offering opportunities. About 5 years ago, we said it’s time to recognize that those changes were happening, and to think about how we can offer opportunities that better reflect the kind of roles that today’s volunteers are looking for. In those 5 years, we have seen some movement on behalf of organizations – towards recognizing that they are missing opportunities and that they can more effectively attract, engage, and integrate volunteers. We have seen changes in the culture of volunteerism and assumptions. For example, creating not only operational roles but also roles at all levels of the organizations including strategy, planning and governance. It’s not yet a tidal wave but there have been some shifts.

Government:

We haven’t pursued those partnerships or been successful.


Question 1:

Relationship with your community, funders, non-profit and government.

Question 2:

What is unique about your community / situation?

Question 3:

What do you hope to gain from participating in a regional, provincial or national non-profit network?

Question 4:

Have your fundraising strategy changed?

Question 5:

Have the demographics of your community changed, how are changes reflected in your services?

Question 6:

Does your community has a community foundation?

Question 7:

What is your organization’s relationship with local aboriginal or first nation’s organizations?